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Hybrid Events


Think of a hybrid event as "the best of both worlds".  You can have live events connecting across multiple venues, with presenters and audiences around the globe.

Hybrid events will be the "new normal" going forward, with uncertainties such as border closures and concerns over travel potentially impacting any event.  Hybrid events give organisers the opportunity to stage shows in-person, yet spread the message beyond borders.

 

A hybrid event usually has 3 components - the host location, remote locations with a live audience, and an on-line audience.  Presenters can be in-person or dialled in remotely.

HOST LOCATION

A host location can be either one of the physical event locations (such as a hotel ballroom), or it can be in a studio.  The host acts as MC for the whole event, and controls the run sheet - who speaks from where, which questions are asked, and so on.  The host has an earpiece so they can hear both the remote locations as well as the show's director, who will be cueing them.  They also often have monitors to see the remote location, as well as autocue for any scripting.

REMOTE LOCATIONS

Remote locations are where your guests are attending the event, and this will have all the usual elements of a live event - registration, food and beverage, decor, and of course full audio visual production.  Often there is a local MC who will welcome guests and do housekeeping before throwing to the main event host.  Often there are presenters in each location who will speak both in front of their live audience, as well as be broadcast to all the other venues.  Guests at each venue watch the main program on a big screen.  The only addition to standard AV is a camera and operator who will feed the signal back into the main broadcast network. 
 

Of course presenters can also be remote as well - we can connect them from wherever they are.

ON-LINE AUDIENCE

In addition to your live audience in your venues, there is also an on-line audience (and they can be anywhere in the world, depending on your requirements).  They view via a web platform, and can see everything your live audience does - slides, videos, and of course the presenters themselves.  They can also participate in polls and Q&As.  And don't forget, you can charge for on-line tickets too!

 

CASE STUDY

One of our clients wanted to hold events in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Adelaide.  The host was in our Sydney studio, and all the venues were feeding audio and video signals to our control room, and we were producing a main mix that went to all venues, as well as to the on-line webcast audience.

Every venue had a local MC who welcomed the crowd and kept that 'local' touch.  We provided a countdown, at which point all venues switched to the one main feed.  The host introed the first presenter in Sydney, who did their presentation to their local audience.  Sydney saw just the presenters slides, but everywhere else saw a mix of closeups of the presenter, audience shots, and slides and videos.  At the end of their presentation, they threw back to the host, who then introduced Melbourne - and on it went.  At the end of the show, questions were taken from each venue and on-line, and when the broadcast concluded there was a panel in each state who spoke to add value to the local audience.

Post-event all presentations were available to view on-line, and this was made available to all guests.  The result?  "One of the highest rating events in terms of engagement that we've ever produced", according to the client!

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